LSO on SALE: new albums & interviews Jul 08 by LSO Live in News

First of all: What is DSD (Direct Stream Digital)?

49 DSD albums on SALE

1). We release LSO Live’s brand new Berlioz ‘Roméo et Juliette’ recording
2). Eight other DSD Albums were added to the NativeDSD store today
3). Two interesting interviews with musicians were conducted and posted here

Enough reason for a label wide sale, wouldn’t you say?
The code works for one week only, through July 15th 2016.

15 % coupon code:

LSOonSALE

valid on all LSO Live’s DSD releases

1). Brand New: Roméo et Juliette

(…) The work performed in the Conservatoire Hall in November 1839 was the result of long and careful consideration of ends and means. ‘Romeo and Juliet, Dramatic Symphony, with chorus, vocal solos, and prologue in chanted recitative, after Shakespeare’s tragedy, dedicated to Nicolo Paganini’, is its title. Berlioz’s later preface later has an ironic edge: ‘There will doubtless be no mistake as to the genre of this work’. In fact there has been a great deal. Yet (as the preface continues), ‘although voices are frequently employed, it is neither a concert opera nor a cantata but a choral symphony’. (c) David Cairns

straight to the album page *

2). Eight other new LSO releases at NativeDSD

Each with a quote. And remember the sale while it lasts:

LSOonSALE
for a 15% discount

 

 

Rachmaninov All-Night Vigil – Vespers

London Symphony Orchestra

Qualities: 64fs
Channels: Multi, Stereo

‘If you are among the Rachmaninov enthusiasts who love the work, it’s hard to imagine it given a better reading than that delivered by Halsey and his LSO forces’ – Classical CD Choice

 


Beethoven: Piano Concerto No 2

London Symphony Orchestra, Maria João Pires

Qualities: 64fs
Channels: Multi, Stereo

***** ‘Pires gave the Beethoven with a directness and confidence that were of a piece with Haitink’s own contribution. But Pires packs a big keyboard personality in that small frame, and the vigorous clarity of her articulation was the stand-out characteristic.’ – The Guardian

 


Mahler Symphonies Nos 2 & 10

London Symphony Orchestra

Qualities: 64fs
Channels: Multi, Stereo

Disc of the Month ‘Powerfully presented by Gergiev and the LSO, with excellent playing from all sections.’ – Audiophile Audition

 


Scriabin Symphonies Nos 3 & 4

London Symphony Orchestra

Qualities: 64fs
Channels: Multi, Stereo

**** ‘Sorcerer of sound, the leader (Gergiev) succeeds in captivating colour blends, beautiful details, and reaches a rare sensuality…the seductive power in his gesture keeps us in suspense from one end to the other of Symphony No. 3’ – Diapason

 


Reich Sextet, Music for Pieces of Wood, Clapping Music

LSO Percusion Ensemble

Qualities: 64fs
Channels: Multi, Stereo

‘The recording in DSD vividly captures the clean acoustic of this venue with the 5.1 multi-channel mix adding just an extra degree of ambience to the sound. Unreservedly recommended.’ – HRAudio.net

 


Elgar – Enigma Variations, Introduction & Allegro

London Symphony Orchestra

Qualities: 64fs
Channels: Multi, Stereo

‘Colin Davis’s LSO Live recordings of the Elgar symphonies are already jewels in the label’s crown, so this release brought with it high expectations. Davis’s way with Elgar is always a fairly flexible one … it gives this splendid account of the Enigma Variations a real sense of a living organism. The LSO plays wonderfully.’  – The Daily Telegraph

 


Rachmaninov Symphony No 2

London Symphony Orchestra

Qualities: 64fs
Channels: Multi, Stereo

‘Breathtakingly beautiful string playing. I greedily anticipate the release of the other symphonies in due course.’ – International Record Review

 


Berlioz L’enfance du Christ

London Symphony Orchestra

Qualities: 64fs
Channels: Multi, Stereo

Performance ***** Sound *****
‘Beuron, probably today’s finest lyric tenor, gives the performance an essential idiomatic core in his narration … [Tenebrae are] dramatically alert and glowing as stained glass, the angelic messages skin-pricklingly ethereal.’  – BBC Music Magazine

3). Two Interviews: meet the musicians

Interview with LSO Principal Percussionist, Neil Percy.
about the release Steve Reich: Sextet, Music for Pieces of Wood, Clapping Music

What do you enjoy about playing the music of Steve Reich?
NP: The thing I enjoy most about playing the music of Steve Reich is its diversity, its complexity, its challenging nature, the fact that you’ve got to put a lot of time into it before attacking it for the first time. We’ve played so many pieces of Steve’s over the years with him being present, and sometimes with him not being present so it’s got a very personal set of challenges that I find completely irresistible and that’s why on this particular project for LSO Live, we tried to put together a program that reflected, really, all of the pieces that the group themselves really like to play.

How do you think his music stands out among the minimalist school as it were? Is there anything in particular, a definitive sort of style of Steve Reich?
NP: Well his music stands out for me because he leads the minimalist school, I would say he’s probably the most important figure in my personal opinion. Of course you have Terry Riley, a bit later you have John Adams, all fantastic composers. But for me, Steve did things that personally really appeal to me, his use of jazz, the vernacular American music, I thought is incredibly interesting that strikes a very deep resonance with me personally, so I think he’s a leader in that field, I really do and I think everyone else kind of followed Steve, but that’s just my personal opinion.

You’ve mentioned that he’s sometimes there during your performances, do you have any stories about meeting with him or performing with him?
NP: Yes, I have a number of stories about performing with Steve. I’ve been really fortunate actually, since my time with the LSO I’ve got to play Clapping Music a couple of times with Steve. So the first time we ever played it, it was for his 60th birthday concert which was back in 1996. The conductor for that particular performance was David Robertson so we were obviously going to go onstage just ourselves to play Clapping Music, but we had the very first run through in David’s room backstage at the Barbican, and Steve was there. I went and introduced myself to Steve, we’d met before but you know. And I said “what tempo, Steve?” and he said “oh no Neil you choose, you choose” and I thought well I kind of like it quite fast so off we went and I could tell straight away that he was taken a little bit by surprise and we were really going for it! It was fantastic and we nailed it, for the first time we’d ever played it together it was really good. But I could see these beads of sweat starting to appear on Steve’s brow and we got to the end of it, really, really good and he said “Gee, I hope I make it to my 61st!” So again that’s the great thing about Steve and I think it comes out in his music. He’s got a wicked sense of humour, very quick, very dry and it’s always been great fun to play that piece with Steve.

Interview with conductor and LSO Coral Director, Simon Halsey.
about the release Rachmaninov All-Night Vigil – ‘Vespers’

Our Rachmaninov concert was a great success. It was a very exhausting programme, an acapella concert lasting two hours is really asking a lot. It’s very different from singing with an orchestra for that time. One way or another, vocally, it was a big evening!

My other choirs, I have a choir in Berlin that sings acapella a lot, and they beg me always not to put the Rachmaninov Vespers down in a concert because the level of concentration required and the sheer vocal dexterity that is needed are so great that people need to go into fitness training for a week before, so I really think that our huge London Symphony Chorus forces did an amazing job.

The Vespers was never intended to be sung all fifteen movements one after the other. It was supposed to be the church music for a whole day’s worth of services. So, the motets would be spread out in matins and prime and vespers and everyone would have had a rest! What is also extraordinary about the Vespers is the virtuosity of the music. It’s all based on a sort of Russian-Gregorian chant if you like, and you might think that that led to being rather simplistic and old-fashioned in the music but Rachmaninov takes it as the basis for such a virtuoso showcase and so much divisi and such very low bass parts. And we all think, don’t we, that the Russians have lots of low basses but in fact when he first wrote it, the choirmaster at the chapel who were doing the first performance wrote to Rachmaninov and said ‘we just don’t have singers like this! They are as rare as asparagus at Christmas’. Interestingly you know, there are in fact in the LSC four or five guys who can get down there, so perhaps asparagus at Christmas is becoming slightly more available than 100 years ago!

It’s a real test in a million ways, there are two big solo parts – a mezzo and a very virtuosic tenor part that keeps coming back and back and back. After the concert, several friends said to me ‘we had no idea you had singers like that who were members of the choir.’ So we’re very lucky indeed.

LSO Live

LSO Live is the London Symphony Orchestra’s own record label and uses the latest technology to capture the orchestra’s most exciting performances.

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