The hidden DSD treasure Feb 17 by Bill Dodd in Dodd's DSD Discoveries

This new segment of the DSD Blog provides you with hidden DSD treasures, introduced to you by Bill Dodd; a retired broadcaster who was born and raised near San Francisco, but now lives in the USA’s Pacific Northwest.

Native DSD is a treasure trove of great music, but you may not be familiar with some of it. My goal is not to “teach” or to “review” — I simply want to share my thoughts on some of the discoveries I’ve made here. Many years ago I discovered Maurice Duruflé’s Requiem (1947). For a very long time the only recording available was by the composer with choir, soloists, a full orchestra, and organ. Duruflé also arranged versions for reduced forces so that the Requiem could be performed in virtually any setting. One of the most beautiful recordings I have ever heard, and certainly the best with just an organ and cello to accompany the choir and soloists is by the Channel Classics artists, The Gents.
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This is a superb set entitled “Lux Aeterna” which includes the Requiem, Duruflé’s Messe cum Jubilo, and a number of shorter  choral works by Poulenc. All are conducted by Peter Dijkstra.  Oh yes— The Gents invited some guest female voices to fill out the parts in the Requiem. This is wonderful music.

 

Even if you are not a fan of organ music, another very nice taste of Maurice Duruflé’s genius is the following recording “The Great Organ Works”:
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Discovery is important to me. Along with finding an exciting new viewpoint of a favorite work, I really love discovering music and composers I haven’t heard before, or haven’t been able to get close to in the past.

 

 

 

What do you think of when you hear the name, Georges Enescu? The Romanian Rhapsodies? The opera Oedipe? Get ready for a surprise:
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Hannu Lintu conducts the Tampere Philharmonic Orchestra in Enescu’s Symphony No. 2 (1912-1914), and the Chamber Symphony (1954). The second symphony is quite Strauss-like (Richard)  in spots, but also reminds me of Korngold and even occasionally of Sibelius. The music is totally accessible and involving. The Chamber Symphony from 40 years later is just as accessible, but shows modern and neo-classical influences. I find both quite enjoyable— and I really don’t understand why they are not performed more often. Take a listen to the excerpts.

More DSD Discoveries next time.

Bill Dodd

Bill Dodd

Bill Dodd is a retired radio broadcaster who was born and raised near San Francisco, but now lives in the USA’s Pacific Northwest. “Discovery is important to me. Along with finding an exciting new viewpoint of a favorite work, I really love discovering music and composers I haven’t heard before, or haven’t been able to get close to in the past.”

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